Your Dream Team for Beautiful Smiles and Faces

Your Dream Team for Beautiful Smiles and Faces

The Neurological Impact of Dental Health | South Side Chicago Dentist

Throughout childhood, children are taught the importance of good oral hygiene, which includes brushing twice a day. Is this enough? Does it affect more than just your oral health? There have been many studies on this subject, but finding the truth can be challenging. Several studies have been criticized, and experts will need to wait a bit longer before truly determining whether poor oral health negatively impacts brain function. Based on the earlier findings, it appears that there is indeed a link between poor oral health and poor brain function.

What else is affected by poor oral health?

Quite a few things can be impacted by this. Brain function is not the only one. Poor oral health can negatively impact the heart. Men are especially at risk for cardiovascular diseases. Hundreds of bacteria from the gums can make their way to the heart and this can lead to the hardening of your arteries. You may experience thickening of the blood, which could lead to a blockage resulting in a heart attack or stroke. Because you breathe in air that has been contaminated by bacteria in your mouth, your lungs are also at risk. Generally, poor oral hygiene can result in inflamed and infected gums and teeth.

How does it affect brain function?

Aside from all the detrimental factors listed above, there has been research suggesting that poor oral health contributes to dementia. Essentially, if you have gingivitis, the bacteria may enter the brain through the various nerve pathways. In addition, bacteria can enter the brain through the bloodstream. According to some experts, this can cause dementia. Some believe it may even be the sole cause of the terrible disease.

Researchers at Rutgers University, New Jersey, conducted a recent study in which they examined whether poor oral health could contribute to brain dysfunction. The study primarily explored certain cognitive aspects and found that they have an impact on memory and general function, something that may surprise the average patient. According to the study, there is a significant relationship between oral health and memory. It is also noteworthy that oral health has the potential to influence complex attention and learning. 

Additionally, there was a relationship between oral health and stress, or at least perceived stress. High levels of stress are associated with dry mouth. Good oral hygiene is even more important for the elderly. The downside of this is that it may lead to impaired cognitive function, episodic memory loss, or in the worst-case scenario, complete dementia.

How Can You Stop It?

Your first step should be to assess your own oral health methods. As a result, you could begin to develop better hygiene practices that could help safeguard you against any of the above issues. If you are unsure of where to begin, speak to your dentist. Make sure you are brushing your teeth at least twice a day, morning and night. Use a good toothpaste, preferably one containing fluoride. Make sure you are flossing every day to keep your gums healthy and prevent decay from developing between your teeth. Mouthwashes are effective in killing bacteria and, when used properly, can be advantageous as part of your oral health routine. Most importantly, be sure you see your dentist at least two times a year to have your teeth cleaned and examined. 

Our dental office is here to take care of all of your dental health needs. Contact us today to schedule an appointment. 

Dental Dream Team
Phone: (773) 488-3738
820 East 87th Street Suite 201
Chicago, IL 60619

Do I Really Need to Clean My False Teeth? | Chicago Dentist

People tend to assume that because dentures aren’t real teeth, they don’t require the same amount of care and maintenance as natural teeth, but this isn’t true. All dentures, whether partial or full, need to be cleaned and disinfected regularly to prevent bacteria and stains. Dentures, as well as your mouth, can be kept in good shape with proper care.

The following tips will help you take care of your dentures:

Rinsing

After every meal or snack, as well as after brushing your teeth, remove and rinse your dentures. The water helps wash away food particles and bacteria. Always handle your dentures carefully and avoid using hot water.

Brushing

It is very important to brush your dentures just as you would your teeth. Every morning and night, brush your gums, tongue, the roof of your mouth, and any natural teeth you may have. You should place towels around your sink as well as a hard floor surface to prevent your dentures from being damaged if they fall. Dentures should be cleaned using a soft-bristled toothbrush and without using any cleaning solutions. Water, denture paste, or non-abrasive toothpaste can be used. You can contact our dental office for recommendations on how to safely clean your dentures.

Removing adhesives

You can remove any adhesive residue by gargling with warm saltwater. You can then use a clean washcloth to clean your gums and the roof of your mouth before rinsing your mouth again with warm water. For stubborn adhesive bits, you can also brush your gums with a soft toothbrush.

Soaking overnight

To clean your dentures overnight, soak them in a denture cleaning solution or water. You can also use a fast-acting cleanser before storing your dentures in water. Be sure to follow the instructions on the denture cleaner package. When cleaning a partial denture, use a solution specifically designed for partial dentures.

When not wearing them, it is important to always submerge your partial or full dentures in water or denture solution. The acrylic can dry out over time and lose its shape, leading to the dentures becoming brittle and not fitting well. Dentures contain hundreds of microscopic holes, so it is crucial to keep them moist to prolong their life. When dentures dry out, the following problems can occur:

  • They become painful and uncomfortable. Moisture keeps dentures pliable, so they stay comfortable in your mouth. 
  • Contamination: If you soak your dentures in a cleaning solution at night, you will be able to keep them clean and eliminate all the harmful bacteria.
  • The material becomes brittle-When they are dry, dentures are brittle, which means they are more likely to break if dropped. If your dentures break, you will have to start the entire process over again.

Make sure you see your dentist regularly to have your mouth and dentures examined and cleaned. Please contact our dental office to schedule an appointment.

Dental Dream Team
Phone: (773) 488-3738
820 East 87th Street Suite 201
Chicago, IL 60619

Visit Us

South Side Chicago Dentist
820 East 87th Street Suite 201,
Chicago, IL 60619

Office Hours
Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday: By appointment only

Contact Us

Yetta G. McCullom, D.D.S., M.S. (773) 488-3738
Cornell McCullom III, D.D.S., M.D. (773) 488-3738
Robin L. Ferguson, D.D.S., P.C. (773) 488-9075

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