Your Dream Team for Beautiful Smiles and Faces

Your Dream Team for Beautiful Smiles and Faces

Your Tooth’s Anatomy | Dentist Chicago IL

What do you know about the formation of your teeth? The more information patients have about their teeth, the better they can take care of them. In addition, they also have a better understanding of how important it is to take care of them.

The tooth is one of the body’s most anatomically complex structures. A tooth’s tissue composition is found only in your mouth and is unique to your teeth.

Teeth, both primary and permanent

Primary teeth, also known as baby teeth, are the first set of teeth that a person develops. By the age of three, most children have all 20 primary teeth. Baby teeth have shorter, thinner roots than permanent teeth, as well as thinner enamel, giving them a much whiter appearance.

These teeth are only the first draft of our bodies. Between the ages of 6 and 12, primary teeth usually fall out and are replaced by adult teeth. All baby teeth will have been replaced by the age of 14 by 28 permanent teeth. A full permanent dentition consists of 32 teeth, including wisdom teeth, which may appear in a person’s twenties.

Teeth Varieties

All teeth are not created equal. Your teeth serve different purposes and thus have different shapes. Because of their various shapes and functions, your teeth have names to help you identify them:

  • Incisors are the four teeth in the middle of the upper and lower jaws. They’re used for chopping, cutting, and holding food. The section of an incisor that you bite with is wide and thin, giving these teeth the appearance of tiny chisels with a cutting edge.
  • Canines are the pointed-shaped teeth. Canines, also known as cuspids (a single-pointed tooth), are located on either side of the incisors. They are used to hold and tear food. Many people mistake them for their fangs.
  • Premolars: Following the eruption of all permanent teeth, four premolars, known as bicuspids, are found next to each canine. Premolars are designed to be larger and more powerful than canines and incisors. They have ridges that crush and grind food to make it easier to swallow and digest.
  • Molars: The molar is the final type of tooth. The 12 molars are flat teeth at the back of the mouth that are very wide and have several ridges to grind up food so that it can be swallowed. Properly chewing your food with your molars can help you avoid digestive issues and choking.

Your tooth’s components

Your teeth are made up of various layers and parts that connect to your jaw. They are also designed to be long-lasting and to aid in the chewing of any food texture. You can also cut a tooth into three sections:

Crown: The crown is the visible portion of the tooth above the gums, and it is composed of three layers. To begin with, it is enameled. The enamel acts as a shield to protect the inside of the tooth. Enamel is the hardest substance in the human body and is essential for tooth protection.

A second layer lies beneath the hard exterior. Dentin, which is slightly darker in color, accounts for the majority of the tooth’s material. Dentine is a bone-like substance that separates the hard enamel from the soft and delicate pulp cavity.

The pulp cavity, located at the core, is where the blood vessels and nerves from the roots meet. This is what gives a tooth life and the sensitivity to feel the temperature of our food and drinks, as well as pain.

Neck: The neck is the middle region of the tooth that separates the crown from the root at the gum line. As a neck, it is slightly thinner than the other sections.

Root: The root is located beneath the gum line and contains more pulp. This section of the pulp contains the nerve endings of each tooth as well as the blood vessels that bring nutrients to the tooth. Each tooth has a different number of roots. Molars will have two or three roots, while incisors, canines, and premolars will have one. The long roots that connect our teeth to our jaws are held in place and cushioned by the periodontal membrane that lies between them and the surrounding jaw bone.

You will be able to detect problems with your teeth more quickly now that you understand how they are constructed. However, our dental office is always available to assist you! How much do you know about the construction of your teeth? We believe that the more our patients understand about their teeth, the better they will be able to care for them. Please contact our office today to schedule an appointment.

Dental Dream Team
Phone: (773) 488-3738
820 East 87th Street Suite 201
Chicago, IL 60619

Useful Knowledge for Wisdom Teeth | Dentist in Chicago

What are wisdom teeth and how did they get their name? Your wisdom teeth are simply your third set of molars. Wisdom teeth generally appear between the ages of 17 and 25. In most cases, people will have to deal with their wisdom teeth at some time or another, so let’s take a look at these interesting and sometimes troublesome teeth.

Why do we have wisdom teeth?

For early humans to chew and eat, wisdom teeth were essential. Because our ancestors ate leaves, roots, and meat, their teeth may have worn down faster, so they needed a third row of molars. The types of food we eat have changed, so they are no longer necessary. Some people never develop them because of evolution over time. But others do, without experiencing any problems. Approximately 85% of people with wisdom teeth will need to have them removed.

Research is being conducted on wisdom teeth as science advances. Researchers have discovered they can be used to produce stem cells. As such, you may want to keep them after they are removed. Alternatively, researchers are looking for ways to prevent wisdom teeth from developing at all.

How do they cause problems?

Humans have developed smaller jaws over time than their ancestors. We simply do not have enough room in our mouths to accommodate extra teeth. Wisdom teeth can crowd other teeth, resulting in cosmetic issues such as crooked teeth, and can cause pain in the jaw, swollen gums, and other mouth irritations.

It is common for them to become impacted. When the teeth are misaligned, there is simply not enough room for them to break through the surface, causing quite a bit of discomfort. Wisdom teeth are also difficult to clean since they are so far back. As a result, they are at risk of infection and decay. Therefore, dentists often recommend removing wisdom teeth.

What are the signs that your wisdom teeth are causing problems?

Normally, this is discovered during routine dental visits, but if you have jaw pain, swollen or painful gums, or a strange taste in the back of your mouth, you should set up an appointment with your dentist to find out what’s wrong.

Our dental office can evaluate the position of your wisdom teeth and recommend appropriate procedures if necessary. If you have questions about your wisdom teeth or would like to schedule an appointment, please do not hesitate to contact our office.

Dental Dream Team
Phone: (773) 488-3738
820 East 87th Street Suite 201
Chicago, IL 60619

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South Side Chicago Dentist
820 East 87th Street Suite 201,
Chicago, IL 60619

Office Hours
Monday – Friday: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Saturday: By appointment only

Contact Us

Yetta G. McCullom, D.D.S., M.S. (773) 488-3738
Cornell McCullom III, D.D.S., M.D. (773) 488-3738
Robin L. Ferguson, D.D.S., P.C. (773) 488-9075

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